Activism can bring about revolutionary change

January 24, 2011 by admin  
Filed under Protecting Habitats

You say you want a revolution, the Beatles sang. Well, you know, we all want to change the world.

Even if its not a revolutionary change you are seeking, here are some tips on preserving a cherished service or advocating for a new policy at city hall.

As I wrote in the last issue, you can achieve small changes by calling 311, your municipal councillor, or by making a deputation at city hall.

But if you are seeking larger policy changes or want to protect services from being slashed, youll need a stronger game plan.

Do your research

Councillor Gord Perks is no stranger to activism, dating back to 1987 when he was involved with Pollution Probe, Greenpeace Canada and Toronto Environmental Alliance all before he entered politics.

You will have opponents so your information has to be as good or better, he said.

So know your facts: why does it make economic, social and political sense for policymakers to agree with you?

Build momentum

You should build popular support across the city for whatever change you want, Perks told me. Identify who your allies are and recruit them.

Find out who your opponents are and the people you can convince in the (undecided) middle.

Stick with it

Working for a better world has to be fun if its going to take you months or years, Perks advises.

So perhaps try out some street theatre to get your point across with a goofy protest.

Remember, you arent going to be successful by making a five-minute deputation at a committee, so plan on advocating repeatedly in as many ways as possible.

You can make a difference

This is not a time to be quiet and assume the government will do what you want, Councillor Joe Mihevc said.

This is a time for active democracy and taking action, he added. Every issue has community people who stood up and said, I want to make a difference in student nutrition, hunger, urban renewal, public health, public transit.

Media attention

As a news reporter for eight years, Ive interviewed my share of groups looking to shine a light on their causes. Media attention should be one of the tools you use to effect change, but it has to be done right.

I remember two stories I reported on about saving school pools that stand out as examples of what worked.

In 2002, Torontonians were facing the possible closure of 85 school pools as provincial funding was going to be pulled. Swim advocates got creative and invited 100 kids and students from across the city to a protest/swim party in a Beach school pool. And they invited the media.

I covered the event, where I spoke to Michelle Agnew and Mikaela Kraus-Glover, a pair of 8-year-olds, who told me why their pool should stay open.

Id feel bad. You need to learn how to swim because people might drown, Agnew said.

Kraus-Glover added: My school pool is where I learned how to swim, so its important to me.

A few days later the province said it had a change of heart.

Of course it wasnt that simple. And the school board has since raised the issue of pool closures almost yearly.

In 2008, faced with the possible closure of the Malvern CI pool, student Hannah Gladstone helped organize a mock funeral for her school pool.

We decided to do a eulogy and funeral because we are feeling our pool is dying, Gladstone said.

My advice: if you want to start a media campaign then know your facts, plan an event, have a website, use Twitter to let people know whats happening, start a Facebook campaign, send out press releases, get a crowd of supporters behind you and have an articulate spokesperson.

Article source: http://www.mytowncrier.ca/activism-can-bring-about-revolutionary-change.html

Topsail beach renourishment project begins - WECT

January 6, 2011 by admin  
Filed under Protecting Habitats

Reported by Lindsay Curtin bio | email

PENDER COUNTY, NC (WECT) - Most people go to the beach to have fun without realizing the work it takes to keep it beautiful.

A $7.3 million project is finally underway for the town of Topsail Beach.

Over the next couple months, dredging companies will be pumping 900,000 cubic yards of sand to the beach. The extra sand will provide added protection against beach erosion and home damage in the event of a hurricane.

“It flattens out the beach, stops the wave action and slows the erosion of the beach, so it basically helps protect from beach erosion in hurricanes and offers a higher level of protection for structures,” said Topsail Town Manager Tim Holloman.

No matter how expensive the project might be, most residents agree it is worth it, considering almost all of Topsail Island sits in aFEMA declared flood zone. The project is expected to be finished at the end of March.

Copyright 2010 WECT. All rights reserved.

Article source: http://www.wect.com/Global/story.asp?S=13790567

Preserving sandy beach ecosystems – the way forward

March 4, 2009 by admin  
Filed under Featured, Protecting Habitats

European Commission DG ENV, Science for Environment Policy Environment News Alert Service
Special Issue 8, Sept 2008

European sandy beach.

The combined impacts of climate change and increasing population pressures on coastal areas for living and recreation have placed beach ecosystems under severe pressure. New research suggests efforts to preserve the biodiversity of sandy beach ecosystems should be undertaken within the framework of Integrated Coastal Management(1). The aim is to integrate the physical protection of coastlines with the conservation of threatened ecosystems.

As key recreational sites, sandy beaches are of prime social, cultural and economic importance and dominate the world’s coastlines. They also provide critical and irreplaceable ecosystem services and there is a growing recognition of the ecological value of beaches. However, current beach management is largely concerned with managing sand budgets and erosion, while ecological aspects are rarely considered.

Co-operation between beach managers and ecologists is therefore important, according to the researchers. They produced 50 ‘key statements’ summarising how essential features of sandy beach ecosystems function and are structured, which include defining the physical features of beaches, the functioning of beaches as ecosystems and incorporating the protection of beach ecosystems with wider management practices.

The researchers suggest that climate change will have a significant impact on the ecology of sandy beaches. It is
anticipated that climate change will affect the following:

  • Sea levels – Average sea levels have risen by 0.17 metres in the last century and there are more occurrences
    of damaging high seas during storms. Continued loss of beaches will severely impact on coastal habitats and
    communities.
  • Extreme weather events – It is likely that changes in cyclone and storm behaviour will produce higher and more
    powerful waves, increasing beach erosion.
  • Precipitation - the pattern of precipitation is changing with more incidences of floods and altered freshwater flow
    to the oceans and this will affect the ecology of the beaches.
  • Changes in the ENSO (El-Niño-Southern Oscillation) events cause alterations to precipitation and this may
    affect beach ecosystems.
  • Within decades, acidification of the oceans will negatively affect marine organisms that need calcium carbonate to form shells, such as urchins and snails.


Four principles have been proposed by the researchers to integrate the ecological and physical aspects of management strategies for sandy beaches, which will help beach ecosystems withstand the pressures of climate change. It is suggested that ecologists, managers and policy makers work together at all levels of decision making in implementing effective and enduring strategies to conserve coastal ecosystems. There is also a need for further development of modelling techniques to study the impacts of climate change on beach ecology and to combine this with the effects that various management strategies will have on beach systems.

A further issue highlighted by the study are the special difficulties caused by tidal conditions for scientists trying to study beach organisms. The researchers have consequently produced a code of ‘best practice’ which contains 11 recommendations to help ecologists develop the most appropriate methods when collecting samples.

1. See http://ec.europa.eu/environment/iczm/ for information on Integrated Coastal Zone Management in Europe

Source: Schlacher, T.A., Schoeman, D.S., Dugan, J. et al. (2008). Sandy beach ecosystems: key features, sampling issues, management challenges and climate change impacts. Marine Ecology. 29(Suppl. 1): 70-90.
Contact: tschlach@usc.edu.au

The Sensual Beauty of the Beach

November 26, 2008 by admin  
Filed under Featured, Ocean Beauty

The beach is a wonderous place where the sheer beauty and sensuality of the environment can reclaim even the most harried minds.

It can take you to a time where there was only mankind and nature — No cell phones, work left undone, cluttered minds and desks, financial problems or job worries…just you and nature in a simple yet intense relationship. The beach can be that side of nature that soothes, stimulates, invigorates and heals. One day at the beach and you are rejuvenated for a time….it stays with you…and that is worth protecting.