San Diego Mayor Limits City’s Use of Single-Use Plastic Water Bottles, Plastic Foam Products

May 18, 2011 by admin  
Filed under Protecting Habitats

San Diego Coastkeeper applauds the action, which stems from the organization’s 2009 proposalSAN DIEGO, CA-May 18, 2011- Today San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders’ office and the Environmental Services Division announced a series of administrative regulations to limit the City’s purchase of single-use plastic water bottles and plastic foam products (often inappropriately referred to as Styrofoam™). San Diego Coastkeeper, the region’s largest environmental organization protecting inland and coastal waters, applauds the mayor’s action, which stems from the organization’s 2009 proposal urging the City Council to take the steps. The new guidelines, announced today to the San Diego City Council Natural Resources and Culture Committee (NRC) and effective on January 1, 2012, will reduce the City’s environmental impacts, potentially save money, reinforce confidence in the city’s municipal water system and set a precedent for other cities in the region.

The item was brought to the Committee after a December 2010 request from former Chair Donna Frye.  Under the strong mayor-strong council form of government, the administrative regulation does not need Council approval.  However, showing support for the ideas within the regulation, the NRC requested that the Mayor’s office report on the implementation of these policies at the November 16 NRC meeting.

“This will show great leadership to the residents of San Diego,” said City Council Member David Alvarez, who chairs NRC. He also noted that the City is the first in San Diego County to take these initial steps.
Specifically but not inclusively, the Mayor’s administrative regulation will:

  • Prohibit the purchase of single-use water bottles and water bottle dispensers with City funds, with the exception of facilities that do not have access to safe tap water to drink
  • Prohibit the purchase of plastic foam food service ware with City funds (referred to as expanded polystyrene, or EPS)
  • Develop standard language for bids that expresses the City’s commitment to eliminating plastic foam in packing materials, using alternative recyclable packing materials when available and/or vendor take back of the packing materials. This includes working with current vendors to reduce plastic foam use.
  • Revise City permit applications; including those for special events, parks and recreation facilities, and water reservoirs and lakes, to prohibit the use of plastic foam food service ware.

“We commend Mayor Sanders for demonstrating environmental leadership and fiscal responsibility with his policy limiting the City’s purchase of single-use plastic water bottles and plastic foam products,” said Alicia Glassco, San Diego Coastkeeper’s education and marine debris manager. “We hope the door will remain open to expand the restriction of plastic foam use beyond City events and that other cities will follow the Mayor’s lead and take similar action.”

The City of San Diego joins 48 California cities that have already committed to reducing plastic foam for environmental reasons and 28 jurisdictions that have limited bottled water purchases to reduce expenses and support public water systems.

“San Francisco canceled its bottled water contracts and saved half a million dollars a year,” said John Stewart, national campaign organizer with Corporate Accountability International. “San Diego will join the ranks of 1,200 cities and five states nationwide that have taken similar steps, saving millions of dollars.”

This step by Mayor Sanders comes on the heels of the statewide Senate Bill 568, which would prohibit the distribution and use of plastic foam containers by food vendors. Currently, the senate floor expects the bill sometime next week. Support organizers identified Senator Juan Vargas as a swing vote on the matter and ask that he take this action as a sign that his constituents are calling for reduced litter and debris.

San Diego Coastkeeper first proposed restricting bottled water and plastic foam at City facilities and events to former City Councilmember Donna Frye in late 2009. Coastkeeper cited beach cleanup data from across the county, which indicates a growing problem of plastic water bottles, plastic bottle caps and pieces of plastic foam littering the environment. In 2010 alone, volunteers removed more than 25,000 pieces of plastic foam, which is lightweight, floats and easily breaks into small pieces making it a challenge for removal from storm drains and the environment.

San Diego Coastkeeper’s website (http://www.sdcoastkeeper.org) hosts more information about beach cleanup data in San Diego County and the harmful effects of marine debris on the environmental, marine mammals and humans.

# # #
San Diego Coastkeeper
Founded in 1995, San Diego Coastkeeper protects the region’s inland and coastal waters for the communities and wildlife that depend on them by blending education, community empowerment and advocacy. Visit them online for more information: http://www.sdcoastkeeper.org.

Signs of the Tide, sponsored by SDG&E Smart Meter and Cook & Schmid, are community events designed to educate, engage and empower participants in issues relating to the health of San Diego’s coastal waters. The meetings rotate locations throughout San Diego. All events are free, open to the community and include light snacks and beverages.

For more information about Signs of the Tide, visit Coastkeeper’s website at www.sdcoastkeeper.org.
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Founded in 1995, San Diego Coastkeeper protects the region’s inland and coastal waters for the communities and wildlife that depend on them by blending education, community empowerment and advocacy. Visit us online at http://www.sdcoastkeeper.org.

Topsail beach renourishment project begins - WECT

January 6, 2011 by admin  
Filed under Protecting Habitats

Reported by Lindsay Curtin bio | email

PENDER COUNTY, NC (WECT) - Most people go to the beach to have fun without realizing the work it takes to keep it beautiful.

A $7.3 million project is finally underway for the town of Topsail Beach.

Over the next couple months, dredging companies will be pumping 900,000 cubic yards of sand to the beach. The extra sand will provide added protection against beach erosion and home damage in the event of a hurricane.

“It flattens out the beach, stops the wave action and slows the erosion of the beach, so it basically helps protect from beach erosion in hurricanes and offers a higher level of protection for structures,” said Topsail Town Manager Tim Holloman.

No matter how expensive the project might be, most residents agree it is worth it, considering almost all of Topsail Island sits in aFEMA declared flood zone. The project is expected to be finished at the end of March.

Copyright 2010 WECT. All rights reserved.

Article source: http://www.wect.com/Global/story.asp?S=13790567

Beach Cleanups Phase Out Plastic Bag Usage

October 13, 2010 by admin  
Filed under Protecting Habitats

by Nichole Bowman

Many clean up organizations are setting wonderful examples and really getting with the program by considering their contribution to the planet’s pollution and waste problem in the materials they use for cleanups. San Diego’s Surfrider Foundation Chapter has posted on their site a new policy for cleanups (from http://www.surfridersd.org/beachcleanups.php):

PLASTIC BAGS PHASED OUT AT BEACH CLEANUPS. In an effort to send less extra stuff to the landfill we are asking that beach cleanup volunteers bring their own reusable bucket, reusable bag or a bag(s) from home that you would throw out anyway. Also, please bring work or garden gloves to use rather then then latex/disposable ones if possible. We will continue to have gloves and a small supply of bags on hand until we can fully get the word out and look to provide reusable supplies in the future.

To help out at an already coordinated cleanup, all you have to do is show up. For all beach cleanups, please wear comfortable clothes, closed toed shoes and sunscreen. Bring gardening or work gloves if you have them. If not, we would be happy to provide you with latex gloves if needed. We also provide the bags, hand sanitizer and other essentials for cleaning up trash. (Feel free to bring you own reusable bag, used bag or bucket to help limit what ends up at the garbage dump.)


While this may seem like a no brainer for some of us purists, most cleanup efforts involve using plastic bags, latex gloves, bottled water for refreshment, among other now becoming-taboo polluting products. One might have noticed this on TV watching the BP oil spill cleanup efforts in the gulf: teams of volunteers scooping up tarball-tainted sand into very large clear plastic bags, which could only hold a small amount and be easily carried. So after a few scoops, bam!, time for a new one. I couldn’t help but ask how much pertroleum was being wasted by the use of so much plastics during cleanup and that maybe there was a better solution given the scope and breadth of this disaster.

So, evidently others are getting the idea. The California Coastal Commission’s Coastal Clean Up Day advertised “BYO for CCD” and fruther stated on their website (http://www.coastal.ca.gov/publiced/ccd/ccd28.html):

For example, in 2009, Coastal Cleanup Day volunteers used more than 130,000 plastic bags and 135,000 plastic gloves during Coastal Cleanup Day. Countless cleanup sites held barbeques, lunches or snacks for volunteers, and many of these generated additional packaging and food-related waste. Thousands of volunteers drove cars to their cleanup sites around the state.

The Coastal Commission is committed to reducing the environmental footprint of Coastal Cleanup Day, but we need your help to do so! Please join our efforts this year by turning out to the Cleanup with a “Bring Your Own” philosophy.

The Kailua Beach Clean Up Day (http://plasticfreekailua.blogspot.com/) further stated that their event was “followed by a low-impact potluck.” Taking the green and sustainability movement all the way is the way to go, in our daily life, in our activism and clean up efforts and in the actions of our organizations. Kudos to those pushing forward the next evolution of responsible living.

Preserving sandy beach ecosystems – the way forward

March 4, 2009 by admin  
Filed under Featured, Protecting Habitats

European Commission DG ENV, Science for Environment Policy Environment News Alert Service
Special Issue 8, Sept 2008

European sandy beach.

The combined impacts of climate change and increasing population pressures on coastal areas for living and recreation have placed beach ecosystems under severe pressure. New research suggests efforts to preserve the biodiversity of sandy beach ecosystems should be undertaken within the framework of Integrated Coastal Management(1). The aim is to integrate the physical protection of coastlines with the conservation of threatened ecosystems.

As key recreational sites, sandy beaches are of prime social, cultural and economic importance and dominate the world’s coastlines. They also provide critical and irreplaceable ecosystem services and there is a growing recognition of the ecological value of beaches. However, current beach management is largely concerned with managing sand budgets and erosion, while ecological aspects are rarely considered.

Co-operation between beach managers and ecologists is therefore important, according to the researchers. They produced 50 ‘key statements’ summarising how essential features of sandy beach ecosystems function and are structured, which include defining the physical features of beaches, the functioning of beaches as ecosystems and incorporating the protection of beach ecosystems with wider management practices.

The researchers suggest that climate change will have a significant impact on the ecology of sandy beaches. It is
anticipated that climate change will affect the following:

  • Sea levels – Average sea levels have risen by 0.17 metres in the last century and there are more occurrences
    of damaging high seas during storms. Continued loss of beaches will severely impact on coastal habitats and
    communities.
  • Extreme weather events – It is likely that changes in cyclone and storm behaviour will produce higher and more
    powerful waves, increasing beach erosion.
  • Precipitation - the pattern of precipitation is changing with more incidences of floods and altered freshwater flow
    to the oceans and this will affect the ecology of the beaches.
  • Changes in the ENSO (El-Niño-Southern Oscillation) events cause alterations to precipitation and this may
    affect beach ecosystems.
  • Within decades, acidification of the oceans will negatively affect marine organisms that need calcium carbonate to form shells, such as urchins and snails.


Four principles have been proposed by the researchers to integrate the ecological and physical aspects of management strategies for sandy beaches, which will help beach ecosystems withstand the pressures of climate change. It is suggested that ecologists, managers and policy makers work together at all levels of decision making in implementing effective and enduring strategies to conserve coastal ecosystems. There is also a need for further development of modelling techniques to study the impacts of climate change on beach ecology and to combine this with the effects that various management strategies will have on beach systems.

A further issue highlighted by the study are the special difficulties caused by tidal conditions for scientists trying to study beach organisms. The researchers have consequently produced a code of ‘best practice’ which contains 11 recommendations to help ecologists develop the most appropriate methods when collecting samples.

1. See http://ec.europa.eu/environment/iczm/ for information on Integrated Coastal Zone Management in Europe

Source: Schlacher, T.A., Schoeman, D.S., Dugan, J. et al. (2008). Sandy beach ecosystems: key features, sampling issues, management challenges and climate change impacts. Marine Ecology. 29(Suppl. 1): 70-90.
Contact: tschlach@usc.edu.au

Saving Our Beaches - National Clean Beaches Week (Dates: July 1-7, 2009)

November 26, 2008 by admin  
Filed under Protecting Habitats

Clean Beaches Week is the “Earth Day” for beaches.
Held annually from July 1-7, it is a celebration of the healthy beach lifestyle.  The four main themes of the week are: food, recreation, travel and our environment.  Founded in 2003, the week has drawn enormous public support: over 150 coastal governors, mayors, and county commissions have now issued proclamations in support of the week.  In 2007, by unanimous consent, both the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives passed resolutions enacting the week.

What it’s all About (aka, the “vision” thing)
We envision Clean Beaches Week as a seven-day celebration of consumers recognizing and embracing the benefits of beaches in their lives. We have developed four initial themes that highlight the importance of beaches to all Americans:

Environment: The 4th of July is the biggest beach holiday in America – and the dirtiest.   During Clean Beaches Week, the public will be strongly urged to “leave no trace” of litter, only footprints at the beach.

Dining: The American Heart Association recommends that all Americans eat seafood at least twice a week.  During Clean Beaches Week, Americans will be encouraged to have a healthy meal everyday during their visit to the beach.

Recreation: More than 180 million Americans visit the beach each year.  During Clean Beaches Week, the public will be urged to get out and get active everyday by playing, surfing, fishing, walking or reading during their beach visit.

Travel:  Each year Americans make 2 billion visits to ocean, gulf, and inland beaches.  During Clean Beaches Week, the public will be encouraged to reduce their carbon footprint though energy efficiency, conservation, carpooling, walking and other green activities.

Get Involved
Individuals, families and communities have several opportunities to support Clean Beaches Week:

- Low-Carbon Beaches (offset program: available for individuals, businesses and municipalities)
- Friends of Clean Beaches (includes: window-decal, guides (safety and seafood), magnet, and wristband)

Sponsorship
To learn about corporate sponsorship and/or licensing opportunities, visit www.cleanbeaches.com.

About Clean Beaches Council
CBC is the lead organization for this national public awareness campaign.  For nearly a decade, CBC has successfully delivered its message promoting clean beaches to over 100 million Americans through television, radio, and print media coverage.   CBC has been featured on The Today Show, CNN, Parade Magazine, Organic Style, Fox News, C-SPAN, The Weather Channel, CBS Radio, ABC Radio, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, Newsday, and National Public Radio to name a few.

(source: Clean Beaches Council www.cleanbeaches.com)